Thursday, November 1, 2012


HAND CRANK RADIO ~







Mike Luster with Owen
(pondering a "Thomas the Train" DVD)

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Out of Arkansas folklorist and farmer Mike Luster is the dream captain of the weekly radio program Hand Crank Radio which can be linked below:





"The one-hour show airs and streams Sunday nights from 7:00 to 8:00 PM via KASU.org, the broadcasting service of Arkansas State University. I post the playlists each week at https://www.facebook.com/handcrank and there you'll find past and future lists as well along with video clips and such."




I know Mike would like to have joining him here the sounds and good presence of musician Jim Lansford ~

"Mourning the passing of our dear friend and master of all stringed instruments, Jim Lansford, simply the best."

 

 Jim and Kim Lansford









2 comments:

Luster said...

Bob,

Nice surprise to come in for a look and see me and my boy. My neighbors would probably laugh at me being a farmer but we're working that direction. Thank you for the mention of the great Jim Lansford. We also just lost Bill Dees here in the Arkansas-Missouri border country. First saw Bill a few years ago at a local songwriters gathering. Everybody was pretty good, then the guy with gray hair and a black cowboy shirt took his turn and began singing "You're baby doesn't love you any more..." the opening to "It's Over" one of the many songs he wrote with Roy Orbison, including "Pretty Woman." I'll be playing both of them on next week's program.

thanks, amigo.

stay close,
mike

Bob Arnold / Longhouse said...

Farmer.

All in the eyes of the beholder, Mike. I've seen you farm.

Yes, Bill Dees, a tip of the cap there as well.

Following the terrible news that builds and builds post-Sandy in the mid-atlantic — one would think upper Manhattan should open its arms to lower Manhattan and give shelter for a week to those needing warmth and drying out. I have a feeling the original inhabitants would practice this.

Back to Arkansas-Missouri line: just think of the wealth of songwriters! Poets! Farmers!

all's well, Bob