Thursday, May 15, 2014

THE DYLANOLOGISTS ~









 FAN
"You don't know who I am, but I know who you are."


BOB DYLAN
"Let's keep it that way."








A curiously thin volume under 250 pages that balances between a well wrought biography of the

 musician — and the freaks, crazies and devoted who make him their own.



David Kinney
The Dylanologists
Adventures in the Land of Bob
Simon & Schuster 2014







6 comments:

ACravan said...

Thanks. I think I might be interested in reading this and I love the exchange between Dylan and the fan printed on the back. I remember the time about 10-15 years ago when the Clinton Heylin Dylan biography was published. It was a pretty good book and marked a turning point in Dylan (and soon other bios of big, living rock stars) where people who knew them actually began speaking candidly about them, seemingly without fear for their own professional reputations. Therefore, Mick Taylor could speak both affectionately, but somewhat critically, of Dylan's work methods (e.g., changing things around constantly in live situations, which audiences and even the band found bizarre and unsettling), and Kenny Aaronson, Dylan's former longtime bass player, could tell the tale of trying to return to the band after recovering from cancer and having Dylan say to him, "Kenny, frankly, I don't give a shit who plays bass." Finally you began learning some new things about the man. And then he gave us Chronicles.

Bob Arnold / Longhouse said...

Curtis,

If you wish to believe what you read.

Compared to Art Pepper's biography, there have been precious few books yet from the rock, pop music scene to compare. Maybe Levon Helm's is one contender.

The Dylanologist (Dylan's own word about the bunch that follow) scraggles through a somewhat biography of the musician and certainly portraits of some of the
admittedly almost insane. It's got a handle.

all's well, B.

ACravan said...

The stories published in Heylin's book ring true. My wife spent her career in the music business (running publicity depts.) and one pleasure of proximity to the artists was collecting the occasional, strange but true, Dylan story. She worked with Levon Helm a long time ago, when he had a fine group in Woodstock called the RCO All-Stars, and naturally he had some fine and funny stories. He was a fine musician and a wonderful man. Curtis

Bob Arnold / Longhouse said...

Curtis,

I've liked quite a bit of the Heylin work — especially the Dylan day by day — which one has to admit, is a gonzo project to even entertain carrying through. He did. Bootleg study also a key work.

Our musician son, Carson, also a music historian already at age 15 (now nearing 30) one day took it upon himself to call Levon Helm for an interview. It worked with David Axelrod, Steve Young, and Larry Becket; why not Helm? And he was right. LH was all there for him, a 16 year old stranger, except L had just had cancer surgery in the throat and wasn't up for much gabbing. But he took the youngster on, and I've always liked any artist who stops and waits a moment to listen to the young.

By the way, Donald Fagen's new book you might want a peek at. . .
all's well, B.

ACravan said...

Your story about Levon Helm doesn't surprise me at all, although it does warm the heart. Levon was the only recording artist we knew (with I believe a single exception) who ever bought us dinner. He is absolutely the only artist we knew who ever threw a party for his record company. It was at his house in Woodstock and included a private fireworks display -- the first one of those we'd ever seen. He had a very generous spirit. For what it's worth, he was the person who introduced Caroline and me to sushi. Curtis

Bob Arnold / Longhouse said...

Curtis,

A good ol' boy from Arkansas introducing you both to sushi! And who dare say the world isn't improving? Still, many of us, without Levon Helm, feel someone is indeed missing.

all's well, B.