Saturday, September 27, 2014


The start of the stonework began the last few days left in August, at the peak.
Be sure you frame the windows below extra strong.

Twin windows now in, trimmed, painted and one is an entrance to the upstairs loft.
Scaffold remains for the stone work already started. The backing and inside wall for the stone work is more steel. We have it, so use it, and it's tough.

It's field stone, irregular, part of the property.
If you have to trim the window frame around the stone, so be it.
Paint the stone in.

Here's looking through the woodlot to where we are

The scaffolding for holding the stone and the worker is as practical as it gets.
The scaffolding lumber will later be dismantled and used for the next job — either as scaffolding
or building material.

Between lugging the stone up the ladder and setting the stone in mud (mortar)
figure a day on each side of each window. The lintel below is four 2 x 6 spruce on edge
with two top plates over that sandwich. Angle braces will also be built in under the lintel.

Detail of the wet work

Bringing stone up to the second floor

Rarely, but now and then I trim a stone. I tend to like what I find and work with it.

Brush the mortar as it sets up to have the sweep and texture of rough stone

Fitting stone just right

Almost there. The supervisor on the ground keeps watch.

Tools of the trade: sacks of mortar, dolly-cart to move stone

Come September

The next day, set in stone

The pause of rock & hammer

Finished up stone

Look for a good face on each stone, some have two

photos 2014  © bob & susan arnold




Luster said...


Utterly beautiful.. Some day, my eyes will take it all in along with the other handmade marvels that are your home.

stay close,

Bob Arnold / Longhouse said...


You know, Mike, we're waiting for you!

I believe I have one more photo showcase about the chapel due for early October, and then we've been encouraged to make it all into a book. It may happen. The long winter months provide lots of dreaming clouds.

Right now I'm stenciling the outside walls, once the heavy morning dew burns off the steel.

all's well, Bob