Sunday, December 4, 2011

EARTH ~
(The Oak)




the mighty acorn



8 comments:

donnafleischer said...

Dear Bob,
My previous home of recently had 64 old oaks in its quadrangle. I miss them. Now on the mountain ridge the only trees are firs, evergreens, sprinkling of birch, but the oaks are nonexistent. Got any tried and true tick protection advice? The article here says 2012 will be a bumper crop for them. The field mice will be decimated by acorn scarcity so the ticks will be licking their chops at sight of us and we like to hike a lot.

Love this photograph. Stately.

love,
Donna

Bob Arnold / Longhouse said...

Hi Donna,

Yes, the red and white oak thin out with altitude, as the softwoods and birches take the higher ground. This can be seen dramatically in the white mountains of New Hampshire.

The woodchopper's axiom now on lyme disease is to watch yourselves in early spring when the nymph ticks (the size of a sesame seed) are blood thirsty hungry. Take all the hikes you want (we do too) but check yourselves in the evening when you are off the trail. Be diligent about this. Better to have someone you love check you all over. The love is the added benefit, always. Go to your vet, yes your vet, and pick up from them the two size pinchers for pulling ticks which they issue (at 5! they'll save your life) for dogs and cats but it's really for all mammals, except modern medicine for humans has yet to catch up. Medicine for humans remains either uppity or sympathetic to those suffering with lyme disease. As you know Susan had a vigorous case of it and like many who have gone down the rabbit hole with it, and survived, there are drawbacks that come after one seems recovered: usually relating to spine, brain, nervous system tics and relapses. Some have migraine headaches, others with far worse neurological mishaps and ailments. Some with the heart. Very best to check yourselves daily in prime season, have the tools, be obedient with your care one to the other, and have a vial of proper antibiotics to take if you happen to have a tick bite. Don't confuse the regular and harmless woods tick (larger) with the lyme tick carrier. It's best to catch the lyme tick within 30 hours after skin penetration. I could on on and on and force some possible bad advice since the options are still open and experimental on how we will all survive with lyme disease. The above has been at least handy and helpful for our long affair in woods work and life with the bugger. By all means: DON'T GIVE UP YOUR LOVE OF THE WOODS. No bug should keep you out of the blue sky!

all's well, Bob

donnafleischer said...

I don't mind your tick prevention program: "Very best to check yourselves daily in prime season, have the tools, be obedient with your care one to the other, and have a vial of proper antibiotics to take if you happen to have a tick bite." Worldly wise and experienced! Once I in fact did more than half-seriously ask Claude's vet if he would be my doctor (he's been vet to my dogs and cats since I was 17!) — he's thorough, kind, gentle, and takes his time.

I'm grateful for your suggestions, Bob. They will be minded.

we battle ever
the fearsome Lyme tick
for love of woods

Bob Arnold / Longhouse said...

Hi Donna,

Is it time to go in with Claude and begin barking so the vet begins to take you seriously as a patient? Maybe!

Or perhaps a meow would do the trick?

You are not the first to think that the care animals now receive is far more attentive and true than the systematic hell-hole otherwise known as our modern hospital.

I love it that you have known the vet since you were 17.

Back to the mighty ticks = we were picking them off into November this year! = while working in the woods daily and thinking the cold nights may have killed them back.

They're tough. You hang tough. Bark.

all's well, Bob

donnafleischer said...

wOOf

(the animals must think us very strange, the furless ones, mostly skin . . .)
As for that vet, Bob, he's been one of few constants in my life, so he really counts for a lot. If and when Claude's sick (rarely, mostly injured) he'll call at 6 in the morning every morning to see-say "How's my buddy Claude?" Then he listens.

Oh, lately Claude's taken to vocalizing in the window at night. Sometimes he almost sounds human, developed quite a vocal register with highs, mediums, even some lows. A little wolflike, too. wOOf

Bob Arnold / Longhouse said...

Hi Donna,

No doubt, a special vet and person. Someone who calls back!

Claude is likewise a special one, so when do we see a photograph of the handsome one?

We had a handsome one, once, by the name of Jack. Malamute. Named after the Yukon legend, or was it the on the road king? ah, both the same. He lived outdoors year round. If you tried to close him up, with a door, he'd go after the door. And I'm not saying he was an animal, but he did howl to the moon.

Some sleepless nights
all's well, Bob

donnafleischer said...

You have me thinking that maybe I ought to howl "to" the moon, too, with Claude. Since I can't sleep. Maybe we were meant to on those few sleepless nights we all encounter time to time and I never know what to do with my self really.

The best Claude photos are on film, but I'll send you two jpgs of his face!

zzzzzzzz, Donna

Bob Arnold / Longhouse said...

Coming to this weeks later, Donna

( did you get to sleep? )

( I bet you did )

(no snow 2 Jan 2012, and the earth waiting to sleep)

all's well, Bob